Next!

Well, we had to wait until today (Monday) to deliver the cabinets because of rain, but they are gone.  It’s time to shovel out my shop and move on.  Bubinga to rub out, get delivered and tour Good Hope Hardwoods. Photos at the end of the blog.


Got an email asking how we dealt with the expansion and contraction on the doors with the “Z” battens.

Z Batten

"Z" Batten

Simple….use a washer headed screw. I used McFeely’s Round Washer Head. I drilled a 1/4″ hole in the batten. I always drill a larger hole in the piece I’m attaching, makes the screw pull or pinch tighter and will allow for movement. I left the screws proud. I wanted the black iron look.

1/4 hole in Batten - Washer Head Screw

1/4" hole in Batten - Washer Head Screw

I also often use a slotted hole, movement in these doors will be minimal. The wood is well seasoned and finished all sides. I even sprayed the underside and all the plywood surfaces, just in case. All the wood is sealed down. I don’t like taking chances and I have never had any issues with wood movement. It just works.


Strip 1 attached to the back of the Unit

Strip 1 attached to the back of the Unit

These cabinets will be hung using a French Cleat. This is simply a strip attached to the back of the cabinet unit with a 45 degree edge and the mate that is attached to the wall. Put the wall section on, level and hang the cabinet….that’s it.

Fits together on a 45 degree cut

Fits together on a 45 degree cut


Brass Rattail Hinge - Fisher Forge

Brass Rattail Hinge - Fisher Forge

I asked David Fisher of Fisher Forge to make me two pair of brass Rat Tail Hinges for our upcoming hanging corner cabinet project. I wanted something special. Man….I really like these. David does super nice work.


Finishing Shelves - Painters Pyramids

Finishing Shelves - Painter's Pyramids

I hope everyone enjoyed the cabinet build along and perhaps saw something you liked. I want to address another email, I was asked if I really use the Painter’s Pyramids So I snapped a picture. Yep, I do. All these pieces and parts, saved a ton of time.


Okay, the finish on the cabinets. I used Gemini Coatings S1150-1 Autumn Oak Stain. I used Zinsser Seal Coat at a one pound cut as the barrier or wash coat. Then a pre-cat lacquer in a flat sheen. Bartley Gel StainChestnut is about a dead ringer for the color. A quick note here. I don’t use a lot of shellac under a pre-cat or a post-cat finish, but a light thin coat as was, used here where its primarily absorbed is fine. I have never had an issue but I wouldn’t use it heavy under it, there could possibly be a durability issue. I’ve never seen it happen but just in case…don’t do it.

I could have also used a lacquer wash coat thinned down about 50% to 75% (a lot). It also works well but as always, a wash coat has to be experimented with to get the proper ratio. Too heavy and the stain won’t take, to light and it will blotch.

I also wiped the stain and sprayed a very thin coat of lacquer then I lightly dusted them with stain thinned about 25%. I turned the air pressure up and used a 1.0 nozzle to get a fine mist. Got nice even color, grain isn’t distorted….did well.


Weekly Contest – September 29, 2008 to October 6, 2008
Lot’s of participation in our Weekly Contest. The winner of Week #1 is David Harms of Katy, TX. David will receive from Woodcraft Supply some George’s Club House Wax!

36 pack Painters Pyramids

36 pack Painter's Pyramids

To enter this weeks contest (ends Monday, October 6, 2008) just join our Our Woodworking Forum and post in the thread “Painter’s Pyramids” how you might use the painter’s pyramid, there are thousands of ideas out there! Each post gets you an entry into the Weekly Drawing.

Stay tuned, new prizes and sponsors each week.


Gonna have some coffee and get started cleaning some….well….maybe. Doing nothing is feeling nice right now.

One last thought, If any of you would like to come to my workshop and build one of our projects with me, let me know. I’m always open for that. (Especially if you are not allergic to brooms. LOL!) Work fascinates me….I can watch ya do it all day!

Catch Ya Later!


Dishwasher End Cap

Dishwasher End Cap

Finishing shelves

Finishing shelves

Adjustable Shelf Supports

Adjustable Shelf Supports

Finished Base Unit

Finished Base Unit

Finished Units

Finished Units

Finished Unit - Above Stove

Finished Unit - Above Stove

Moulding/Cap Top Upper Units

Moulding/Cap Top Upper Units

Base Unit with Blacked Out Base/Toekick

Base Unit with Blacked Out Base/Toekick

Dovetailed Drawer w/drawer slide

Dovetailed Drawer w/drawer slide

Inside Base Unit Top Construction

Inside Base Unit Top Construction

Open Shelf Unit - Upper

Open Shelf Unit - Upper

Drawer & Door Detail

Drawer & Door Detail

Shelf Battens

Shelf Battens

Base Corner Unit - Half Shelves/Full Shelves

Base Corner Unit - Half Shelves/Full Shelves

Base Unit with Shelves

Base Unit with Shelves

Refrigerator Side Unit

Refrigerator Top Unit

Large Open Shelf Upper Units

Large Open Shelf Upper Units

Blind Corner Base Unit

Blind Corner Base Unit

Cabinet Base Unit - Note Toekick

Cabinet Base Unit - Note Toekick

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14 Responses to Next!

  1. Larry Nagel says:

    I’m not really understanding the french cleat setup. I don’t understand the first picture. I thought I knew what a french cleat was. Guess not. Could you post another picture. Maybe I’m just not looking at it right. Thanks.

  2. Charles:

    Absolutely beautiful! The finish is AWESOME, that’s not nasty pine anymore. Thanks for taking the time to show us. All the extra time and effort I could only imaging.

    -Ace-

  3. Mike Galloway says:

    Cabinets look good. I like the color. Hope we get to see a picture of them after they are installed. Have a safe trip to New Hope and don’t forget that we have a BYOG law here in PA.

  4. Ken Weinert says:

    Let me give the French Cleat explanation.

    You make the cut on the 45 in the board you’re using as the cleat. Now, take one 1/2 of the board and mount it against the wall with the low point against the wall. The cut section of the 45 will face the wall and the 45 will be going in an upwards direction.

    Now take the other 1/2 of the board and fasten it to what you’re hanging. In this case the cut faces the cabinet, but the 45 will be on heading outwards (and downwards) of the cabinet (or whatever you’re hanging.)

    This way, when you set the two boards against each other and the 45s try to slide past each other they’ll be stopped by the wall and cabinet.

    Does that make sense? I’m sure someone else will post up a picture. I think what threw you off is that the picture wasn’t oriented in the way you’d have it in actual use.

    I tried to modify the given picture, but I’m not sure I can upload it in a comment. So, here’s a link: http://quarter-flash.com/FrenchCleat.jpg

    In that picture the cabinet is attached to the top piece of the cleat and the bottom piece of the cleat is attached to the wall.

  5. Larry Nagel says:

    Hi Ken,
    Yes, I now see what you are talking about with the french cleat. What threw me off was I thought the cleat on the cabinet and the wall were across the cabinet and across the wall. This is vertical but the same thing. Thanks.

  6. Denis Rezendes says:

    very nice! i love the finish on the cabinets! really tamed that pine. and they are beautiful cabinets too. i really like the adjustable shelf system also. its a very nice system. looks cool too. I just might have to take a stop by your shop sometime. maybe April or February vacation if i am not busy. i’ll be like a kid at a baseball game, awestruck and speechless 😉

  7. David Harms says:

    whoohoo, thanks Charles!

    Cabinets really turned out nice! This is the second time in several days that I have seen the french cleat used and I like it … i need to make some cabinets for my shop and I definitely think I will use this technique for hanging them.

  8. intheworkshop says:

    Thanks all ..and Ken excellent job on the french cleat, Mike I think BYOG..means bring your own groceries..right….

  9. Ken Weinert says:

    I’m betting the G in BYOG is Grits 🙂

    After all, you *are* heading north, right?

  10. Mike Galloway says:

    You got it Ken!

  11. intheworkshop says:

    hey I aint bringing no grits north…ya’ll might get to liking them….and then the next thing ya know you’ll be eatin “biscuits and gravy”…with grits…and then youll be wanting to move south….No way grits go north..ya’ll stick with them taters…he he he

  12. Ben Birdsill says:

    Charles – we’ve got biscuits & gravy here in Montana, and if you ever want to come for a visit, I’ll find some grits – just what is a grit?

  13. intheworkshop says:

    a grit is the heart of a corn kernel…boil them…til soft…has about no taste, got to load them up with butter ,and salt and pepper to make them fit to eat…but they were cheap, and plentiful in the south so it became a southern staple….they like rice ,will also take on the flavor of whatever they are cooked with..so they became a meal stretcher…or filler if you will…and the whole world likes biscuits and gravy…whats not to like….a ton of starch , grease and salt…man im gettin hungry…and i dont want to hear about low cal, healthy biscuits and gravy…that would be just not be cool….geez wholegrain biscuits..soy gravy….now i aint hungry anymore

  14. Ben Weber says:

    Charles,

    Great stuff. Thanks for sharin’! Man you made that pine dance!!!

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